Tag Archives: weather

A Little Advice For You Photographers Out There

Sunrise over “The Mountain” at Tipsoo Lake, Mount Rainier National Park

Each photo you take tells a story. I practically hammer that in to my readers in my monthly photo columns on the National Parks Traveler . But, I have some advice for you photographers who post your images out there on Flickr, Twitter, or Facebook:

Write a little bit about your photo, too. Add to that story.

People enjoy reading about how you captured the image, what you were feeling, what camera you used, even your settings. It adds to your story, fleshes it out, and helps others figure out settings for their own camera in similar situations. It also makes you more engaging, both as a photographer and a storyteller.

It drives me nuts to see an interesting image with no title, no commentary, no exif, no nuthin’. Now, I can understand why a photographer might not wish to indicate the location of the photo, since many places are loved to death, aready – no need to add to that. But, it’s a primary rant with me that many photographers won’t tell a damned story. Yeah, the sunrise over the mountains in that photo is gorgeous, and yeah, it looks a little cold, but surely there is more to it than that! What did you feel at the time you clicked that shutter button? How many miles did you have to hike to get there? Know anything about the ecosystem there; any sort of facts or trivia to impart to your viewers?

For instance, I took a couple of day trips this month (June 2020) over to Mount Rainier National Park, here in Washington state, for some photography. I was itching to get out with my cameras, but leery of things due to the coronavirus pandemic. When I visited, I practiced my social distancing, went to areas where there were few-to-no people, wore a mask where there were people, and thoroughly enjoyed myself – except for that one moment when a woman in a group not practicing social distancing came up to me, pointed at my mask, and told me I needed to take it off.

I posted some of those images on Flickr, and added commentary along with exif data (specific information about the image, including settings, etc.), because I want people to see the exposure information and to visibly see the difference visiting the same spot can make during different seasons, different times of the day, and under different weather conditions; in this instance, rainy and overcast versus a blue-sky day.

My first trip to the park since the coronavirus pandemic was June 8th, shortly after it reopened. My second trip was June 18th. The difference in weather is dramatic and you can see it in the images.

A fast-flowing stream on an overcast day, Mount Rainier National Park
A sunny day along the same stream in Mount Rainier National Park

The first time I visited, I did not go via Chinook Pass to Tipsoo Lake because I knew things would be snowed over and, due to the rainy, overcast weather, I figured The Mountain would be hiding behind an iron curtain of gray fog. The second time I visited, I did drive by Tipsoo Lake, as you can see from the image at the top of this post.

The view from Ricksecker Point on June 8th
The view from Ricksecker Point on June 18th

I won’t make this post any longer, since attention spans aren’t what they used to be. But you should get the gist of what I am saying to you. If you post to a public viewing site, then write a little commentary / story to go with the image so people get a better flavor of the atmosphere and feeling around the photo.

FYI, in case you wish to quibble, photo essays are a little different, and there, you do need to be able to tell a story with just your photos and captions. Flickr, FB, and Twitter, however, are not exactly conducive to photo essays.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Mount Rainier National Park, Mt. Rainier National Park, National Parks, Photography, Telling A Story, Travel, Washington State

Photography In The National Parks: Back In Business Again

Forest Magic in the lower elevations

My photo article has been published on the National Parks Traveler. Usually, my columns are published a little closer to the end of the month, but this one is different in that it deals with what you might see if you happen to visit Mount Rainier National Park anytime soon, since it’s reopened the road from the Nisqually entrance to Paradise.

To read the article, click on the image above.

As for this photo – the rain was pelting down as I got out of the car with my camera. I captured this image handheld because it was a pain to get out the tripod and set it up in the downpour. Even my camera’s rain protection was beginning to get saturated, and my bangs were plastered to my forehead. Yes, I did wear a rainjacket but didn’t pull the hood over my head because water kept dropping from the hood onto the camera. It was a mess and I was lucky to get this shot.

This was using my Nikon D850 and 24-120 lens. This is the lens that I won’t ever use again because out of all the shots I took with it, only this and one other image turned out. I’d read about problems with this lens but didn’t think it would happen to me. I guess sort of like people thinking coronavirus won’t happen to them. I *thought* everything was hunky dory after doing some lens calibration, but apparently not. Live and learn. Better to have this happen with a nearby park trip than next month’s Crater Lake trip.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Mount Rainier National Park, Mt. Rainier National Park, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Photography In The National Parks, Travel, Travel and Photography, Washington State

Happy Winter Solstice 2019

Becky And Her Snowlady CROPTrying To Straighten The Leaning SnowladyBecky And FriendBeckys Hand On The Snowladys Boob

My friend and I would like to wish you all a Happy Winter Solstice. The morning after having had fun playing in the powdery snow the previous day, I woke and the weather was warmer and the snow was wet enough (because it was melting, to some extent) for me to very quickly roll together a lovely little snowlady. I didn’t really have enough time to spend with the details – the mouth and nose are wrapped chocolate candy kisses, and the – er – anatomical details are a couple of baubles I took from the Christmas tree. I let her borrow one of my hats. Because the weather kept getting warmer, the candy kisses kept falling out. The tripod was set up and I used my wireless remote. I’d get a photo and then realize her nose was on the ground, or part of her little smile had fallen, so I’d have to get another shot or two. And then, I noticed she was leaning, like the Tower of Pisa. It got worse as the day grew warmer. By the afternoon, with a temperature of 58 degrees F, there was nothing left of my friend except a couple of small piles of slush. Ah well, we had fun in the snow for a little bit and I can say I was able to make my snowman – er – snowlady.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Life, Photography, weather

Different Weather, Times, Seasons In Yellowstone

A Chilly Morning At The Upper Geyser Basin

Old Faithful during a summer sunrise, Yellowstone National Park

Early Morning Activity At Old Faithful

Old Faithful during a chilly, autumn sunrise, Yellowstone National Park

Lower Falls On A Stormy Autumn Midmorning

The lower falls of the Yellowstone River on an overcast, snowy day, Yellowstone National Park

Sunrise Over The Lower Falls

The lower falls of the Yellowstone River during a freezing autumn sunrise, Yellowstone National Park

I know I’ve mentioned this before, but I’ll re-mention it in this post. It’s a great idea to take your camera and revisit a favorite site of yours during different seasons, times of day, and weather conditions. You’ll be surprised at how different your composition can look.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under Canon, Canon Lens, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, Travel, weather, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

Time Of Day And Weather Differences

Denali LandscapeMorning Reflections At Nugget PondMisty Morning At Nugget PondA Stormy Denali Sunrise

Morning Views of Nugget Pond, The Alaska Range, and Denali Mountain

I write a monthly “Photography In The National Parks” column for the National Parks Traveler. I try to gear the column for any type of photography, from smartphone to point-and-shoot to SLR. I will own up that quite a few of my tips involve things for SLRs, like Neutral Density and Polarizing filters, but for the most part, the tips and techniques I include are for any sort of photographer. One of the tips I emphasize in many of my articles for this column is to visit (re-visit) a favorite spot during different seasons, weather conditions, and times of the day. The images above, taken during an August stay at Camp Denali in Denali National Park & Preserve, were captured during the morning hours, but on different days and under different weather conditions. As you can see, they all look a little different, don’t they?

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under Alaska, Canon, Canon Lens, Denali National Park, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Photography In The National Parks, Seasons, summer, Travel, weather

Rainy Days And Thursdays

Hellebore In The Rain

Hellebore in the rain

Standing Tall In The Rain

Standing tall

Ok, not quite the words to the song, but you get my drift. Maybe it should be more like “April showers bring May flowers,” although these flowers are already in bloom and it’s not yet May.

Raindrops on spring flowers are very photogenic, if you don’t mind getting wet to get the shot.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under 1DX Mk II, Bad Weather, Canon, Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM, flowers, Photography, Seasons, Spring

Cheers!

Cheers

It’s what you do when you are a photographer taking a break from shoveling the driveway. And yes, it’s single malt.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 5DS, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon Lens, Life, Photography, Seasons, Washington State, weather, winter

Don’t Let A Little Bad Weather Stop You

Where Is Mt Rainier

The National Parks Traveler has just published my latest “Photography In The National Parks” article.  Click on the photo to go to my story.

 

 

 

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Filed under Bad Weather, Landscape, Mt. Rainier National Park, nature, Photography In The National Parks, rain, Travel, Washington State

Black Skimmer In The Rain

Black Skimmer In The Rain

 

It’s been dull, gloomy, foggy, chilly and rainy for over a week now.  The sky has been a matte pewter-gray without even the benefit of interesting clouds.  This is more Pacific Northwest weather as opposed to southeast Texas weather.  A little depressing, actually.  Enough to make me want to return to work on Monday…and it’s only Saturday!    Sigh.  I and my cameras are definitely going to travel somewhere next December Christmastime; staying static in Texas is just not me.

C’mon, 2015!  Let’s get to the interesting stuff I have planned for this year!

 

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Filed under Canon, Canon Lens, Life, Photography, rain

Same Scene, Different Seasons (and Time of Day and Type of Weather)

I’m back from a 2-week trip to Alaska to find that the National Parks Traveler has published my latest photography article.  Extremely short on words but lots of photos to prove my point.  If you want to check it out, click on this link.

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Filed under Big Bend, Glacier National Park MT, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, Texas, Travel