Tag Archives: National Parks Traveler

Earthquakes In Yellowstone

Mud Volcano Area

Mud Volcano area on a chilly autumn day, Yellowstone National Park

With my background in earthscience, I am always interested in the geology of national parks I visit. Today’s edition of the National Parks Traveler has an interesting article about earthquakes in Yellowstone National Park and how often they occur.

To read the article, click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

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Filed under Canon, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Yellowstone National Park

My 10 Fave Pics From 2019

Bridge Over The Ohanapecosh

Every January, I write an article for the National Parks Traveler about my favorite photos from the previous year. The number of favorites differ each year, and this year, from my visits to four different national parks, I chose 10.

To read the article and see which 10 I chose, click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Uncategorized

Would You Pay $150/Night For A Tent In The Everglades?

Relaxing on the 40 Mile Porch

Trust me when I tell you, I’ve paid more than $150/night for a simple cabin (but with a bunch of other perks) at Camp Denali in Denali National Park. But, would I pay $150/night for a tent with a fan and a queen-sized bed and really, not much else, in Everglades National Park?

Would you?

The National Parks Traveler recently published an article about this $150/night tent and wants to know what you think. To read the article and leave your comment, click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

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Must You Visit A Place In Order To Connect And Want To Protect It?

Alone In The Falls

That’s a question asked in one of today’s articles in the National Parks Traveler. It uses Katmai National Park and Preserve as an example. I found it to be a very interesting, well-written read, and it not only brought back memories of my own 2013 visit to this amazing park, but it also left me feeling a little weak, as well. Personally, I don’t need to visit a place to care about it’s welfare, although having actually experienced a place does go a long way in getting a person to connect. I’ve certainly met enough people who have never ever visited a national park or national monument who could care less about its welfare, simply because they have never been able to experience what it’s like to be in that place.

To read the article for yourself, click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

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Filed under Alaska, Katmai National Park, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel, Uncategorized

Where The Road May Take Me In 2020

Park Road Past A Teepee

In 2018, the road took me from southeast Texas up to central Washington, with stops in places like Petrified Forest National Park, in Arizona, as seen in the photo above.

In 2019, the road took me to Mount Rainier, Olympic, andYellowstone national parks in addition to the North Cascades Complex.

This year, 2020, I believe the road will take me to several places. I’ve already made reservations for a cabin in May outside Crater Lake National Park, in Oregon (yes, I’ll take my snowshoes). And, I was talking to my National Parks Traveler editor, Kurt, yesterday, who gave me a list of some lesser-visited places about which he’d like to see stories written, and I think I have a plan, now.

You see, here in the Pacific Northwest, I live closer to more national parks and national monuments and national recreation areas and national historic sites than I ever did in southeast Texas, and I’d like to explore a little “closer” to home, within driving distance, this year. So, I think I’ll make trips to Lake Roosevelt NRA (with a side trip to Grand Coulee Dam), and John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. I’ve seen spectacular landscape images of that Oregon site.

I’d also like to make a longer road trip to follow (and photograph) the 38 sites (or most of them, anyway) of the Nez Perce National Historical Park. This covers four different states (WA, ID, OR, and MT) and would certainly be an undertaking. This, though, hinges on what happens to me in April. You see, I applied for one of three Artist-In-Residence positions in Glacier National Park. They are supposed to notify their choices in April. I’m definitely not holding my breath on this, though, since last year’s applicants numbered around 600, I believe I was told. Six hundred applicants for 3 spots. That’s quite a bit of talent from which the Glacier staff can choose. So I’ll do a little alternate planning in the meantime.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

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Filed under Canon, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel

Climate Change And Big Bend National Park

Morning View of Big Bend Scenery

Whether people want to believe it or not, climage change is a real thing and it’s being factored into many things, such as the water supply for the Chisos Mountains Lodge at Big Bend National Park in West Texas. There’s an article about this in today’s edition of the National Parks Traveler.

To read the article, click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

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Filed under Big Bend, Big Bend National Park, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Texas, Travel

National Parks Traveler’s Latest Podcast

Arches National Park Scenery

Every Sunday, the National Parks Traveler publishes a podcast about our national parks and the interesting things you can see or do, as well as the interesting things other people are doing for the benefit of our parks.

In this week’s episode, the Traveler interviews former National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis, who talks about his work with the Institute for Parks, People and Biodiversity and how the Park Service is dealing with climate change.

The Traveler also talks with Tumac√°cori National Historical Park’s Chief of Interpretation Anita Badertscher to learn about her park and what awaits visitors there.

To listen to the podcast, which runs about 50-some minutes, click on the image above.

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Podcast