Tag Archives: geology

Can Lessons Learned From The White Island Eruption Be Applied To Yellowstone?

Geyser Eruptions CROP

Each of the two times I’ve visited Yellowstone National Park, I stood on the boardwalks of Upper Geyser Basin, marveling that I was standing above turbulent geothermal activity right beneath my feet, covered by fragile ground. I think people forget that, sometimes, which is why they do stupid shit like go off the boardwalks and try to get closer to the geysers and hot springs.

Today’s edition of the National Parks Traveler has the latest Yellowstone Caldera Chronicles column about New Zealand’s White Island eruption and the lessons learned that might be applied to Yellowstone. It’s a pretty interesting read, written by a U.S. Geological Survey research hydrologist.

To read the article, click on the image above

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Canon, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Yellowstone National Park

Scenic Science In The National Parks, And Some Bison Management

Black Growler Steam Vent And Ledge Geyser

I just finished listening to the National Parks Traveler’s Podcast Episode #51. Loved it! I had the book on pre-order already and am really excited about reading it when it becomes available. And of course, I love bison. If I didn’t think the hummingbird was my spirit animal, I would think bison were. Anyway, if you like wildlife, botany, geology, or bison, you should give this podcast a listen.

Just click on the image to be taken to the podcast site

As for this image, it was taken during my atumn trip to Yellowstone National Park. It’s what I first beheld when approaching Porcelain Basin, within the Norris Basin area. Those two steamers there are, I believe, Black Growler Steam Vent and Ledge Geyser. Correct me if I am wrong. I was looking at a map of the area and they seem to be in the same position as the two named entities.
 
For all that autumn is a less-visited time (relatively speaking) for Yellowstone, this particular area was pretty crowded, mainly with tour buses. So I had to stand there a bit in order to get a clear, non-peopled shot. That gorgeous turquoise water makes me think of glacier-fed waters, but in reality, these waters are hot and would literally skin you alive if you dipped a toe in them because they are so caustic.
 
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

Leave a comment

Filed under Canon, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Podcast, Travel

Earthquakes In Yellowstone

Mud Volcano Area

Mud Volcano area on a chilly autumn day, Yellowstone National Park

With my background in earthscience, I am always interested in the geology of national parks I visit. Today’s edition of the National Parks Traveler has an interesting article about earthquakes in Yellowstone National Park and how often they occur.

To read the article, click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Canon, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Yellowstone National Park

Trivia Tuesday

Blue Star Pool

Blue Star Pool on a chilly autumn morning, Yellowstone National Park

It’s Trivia Tuesday, folks! Here’s one from Janet Spencer’s “Yellowstone Trivia”: One ranger set out to remove the pennies from Upper Geyser Basin’s Blue Star Pool. After 15 minutes of work, he removed 700 pennies. That means 700 people figured “just one penny” wouldn’t hurt.

As a National Park placard says near another hot spring in Yellowstone National Park: “Thermal features are not trash cans or wishing wells – they are among earth’s rarest geologic treasures …”

Do your part, don’t litter, pack out what you pack in, and report any vandalism to a park ranger.

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under autumn, Geology, National Parks, Seasons, Travel, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

Withstanding Time And The Elements In Zion National Park

Withstanding Time And The Elements

I may be an SLR gal, but I freely admit that point-and-shoots are great at capturing national park images, too. When I am out in the parks, I always carry one of my two little point-and-shoots in my pocket. They are not only backup in case the photographic unthinkable happens, but they are great at getting macro shots.
 
This photo of a ponderosa pine growing atop a cross-bedded red-rock knoll (probably a little lithified sand dune) and framed by other trees, was captured with my Canon GX7 MkII. While it’s not the most sturdy of cameras around the lens area (the dainty little shutter blades that made up the “lens cap” and opened and closed when the camera was powered on and off broke off when the camera accidentally fell out of my vest pocket. Thankfully, it still works and I purchased a push-on lens cap to protect the lens.
 
So, don’t knock the point-and-shoots. They produce some nice little images, too.
 
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

1 Comment

Filed under Canon, Equipment, GX7 Mk II, National Parks, Photography, Point and Shoot, Seasons, Travel, Utah, winter, Zion National Park

Solitary Geyser

Solitary Geyser

A morning alone with Solitary Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

This pretty geyser is indeed, solitary, sitting all by itself and located a short hike from either the Upper Geyser Basin boardwalk or on the way up or down the trail from Observation Point. This is one of those geysers that people tampered with way back when they didn’t understand geysers or geology that well. They wanted to use the hot spring water so they put a pipe in it, which lowered the water level several feet and caused the then-hot spring to turn into a geyser that erupted every few minutes. They removed the pipe and the water level rose again, but it continued to be a geyser that now erupts every 5-7 minutes (give or take). It’s not a huge geyser, though. It sort of “burbles” and erupts about 3-4 feet (so the nearby sign says). It was difficult to even see it erupt on that chilly day because of all the steam. I could only tell it was going to erupt by watching for ripples in the water in the far left corner of the geyser, which occurred just before that “burble” of an eruption.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

1 Comment

Filed under 5DSR, autumn, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon Lens, Geology, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, Travel, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

Opalescent Pool And Black Sand Basin Landscape

Black Sand Basin Landscape

I first visited Black Sand Basin in Yellowstone National Park during the evening on the previous day from this shot. It was overcast and getting dark and I didn’t even notice this little side area next to the entry drive to the parking lot. I didn’t see this until I visited the next morning, a lovely, sunny day. I’ve been reading: TravelBrains’ “Yellowstone Expedition Guide” and learned this interesting fact: the trees you see here are dead, of course. The bottoms of their trunks are white because they absorbed the hot water in the area, which is filled with silica in solution. That silica comes out of solution and is what has colored those trunk bottoms. It’s the first step in petrification of the trees. Oh, and Black Sand Basin gets it’s name from the black obsidian sand grains in the area. Cool, huh?

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

Leave a comment

Filed under 5DSR, autumn, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon Lens, Geology, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, Travel, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park