Tag Archives: epiphyte

It’s Fun Fact Friday, 4-3-2020!

Recently, I received my book Scenic Science of the National Parks. The National Parks Traveler had done a podcast interviewing the two authors of this book and it sounded pretty cool, so of course, I ordered it. I love learning things about the national parks I’ve photographed, and am pleased and proud that I’ve photographed some of the things mentioned in the book. Here are some interesting facts straight from the book.

Rainforest Growth

This veiny-lettucy-cabbagey lichen in the photo above is called Oregon Lungwort, and it can pull nitrogen straight out of the air.

Oregon Spikemoss

Oregon Spikemoss can grow 6 feet in length. When parts of this moss die, the spiky leaves curl up and turn brown.

Licorice Ferns And Big Leaf Maple

These bright green, delicate ferns waving in the breeze are called licorice ferns. They grow on epiphytes (plants growing on plants) on Bigleaf Maple trees (I didn’t even know this was a maple tree until I looked closely at the leaves) and really do taste like licorice … if you like licorice, that is (ugh).

And now you know!

Scenic Science

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under Fun Fact Friday, National Parks, Olympic National Park, Photography, Travel, Washington State