Tag Archives: bear

Fun Fact Friday!

Baby Face

It’s Fun Fact Friday, folks! Did you know that the average weight of an Alaskan brown bear in Katmai National Park (after eating lots of salmon) is 1,000 lbs (~454 kg)? That’s a bunch of bear!

It’s hard to believe 6 years have passed since my visit to this national park. That little cub you see there should be full grown (hopefully) and around to eat plenty more salmon coming through the Brooks River.
 
Speaking of Katmai National Park, the 2020 Brooks Camp Bear Pin Logo Contest is underway. When visitors first arrive in this national park, they must undergo a mandatory bear safety orientation. The pins are presented to the visitors after completion of this training session as a visual reminder.
 
If you are interested in knowing more about the contest, click on the image above. You have until February 14 to enter.
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Alaska, bears, Katmai National Park, National Parks, Photography, Travel, wildlife

TFW It’s Friday!

Wheee

Wheeee! TFW (that feeling when) you know it’s Friday and you have a fun weekend planned.

I’m working on the Lake Clark National Park and Preserve gallery on my photo website. One more gallery after this one and I’ll be up to date with keywording the National Parks and Other Landscapes folder on the site. The Lake Clark one will take a little longer because I found images I’d not even looked at in the archives. I don’t know why I never worked on them. Maybe I didn’t have the editing skills to bring out the potential. Who knows. At least I have a few more images to add to the gallery, so there will be more than just 46 images for that gallery (some galleries have way more images, and others have around that many or less).
 
This little guy (or gal – I didn’t look up its knickers) was having fun rolling down a pebble incline while it’s mother watched off to the side. I was with a photo tour and we were in the referenced park, standing on the beach and photographing this momma and her cubs that had emerged from the forest. It was one of those trips where, if it hadn’t been for her and her babies, we would not have had much wildlife to photograph during our stay. It’s like that, sometimes, with wildlife and with wildlife photo tours. Sometimes you have a plate full of fun, and other times, you make do with what you can get.
 
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Alaska, bears, Canon, Canon 500mm f/4L IS II, Canon Lens, Humor, Lake Clark National Park, Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, National Parks, Photography, Travel, wildlife

The Summer Essential Guide – National Parks Traveler

H5T4090-31.jpg

I made the front cover *and* back inside page of the latest Essential Guide published by The National Parks Traveler!  Click on the photo to be taken to the article where you can click on the guide to read it (so many clicks, I know).

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Photography In The National Parks: All About The Bears

A Morning Stroll Along The Beach

 

The National Parks Traveler has just published my latest article to their site.  Click on the photo to be taken there.  And while you are at it, check out my previous article as well.

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Filed under Katmai National Park, Lake Clark National Park, National Parks, Travel and Photography

Katmai Landscapes

Howdy Everybody!  If you are interested in seeing the kind of landscape images you can capture at Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska, then click on this link to be taken to the National Parks Traveler website, where is published my latest article for their Photography In The National Parks column.  And while you are at it, go over to the National Parks Traveler’s facebook page and Like them.

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Filed under Alaska, bears, Equipment, Katmai National Park, Landscape, National Parks, Parks, Photography, Travel, Travel and Photography

Behind The Scenes At Katmai–The Brooks Falls Platform

Stakeouts

Talk about iconic.

Gotcha

When I told people that I’d been to Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska, each and every one of them would give me a blank stare.  Whereupon, I would ask them if they’d seen photos of the bears standing at the waterfall with their mouths open, catching the salmon jumping up the falls.  Then, the light bulb would turn on for them.  Everybody is familiar with these iconic images, even if they don’t know the exact location.

Unless there is a sow with cubs at one of the other viewing platforms, the Brooks Falls Platform is by far the busiest, most crowded, most popular platform.  So busy, as a matter of fact, that there is a ranger there during peak hours, clipboard in hand, taking names and allowing 1 hour of viewing time before those names are called and people are asked to move to make room for others waiting their turn.

Brooks Falls And The Platform

The photo above makes it look like there’s not many people at the platform, but I can tell you for a fact that when this image was taken, both lower and upper tiers were crowded cheek-by-jowl with photographers, their tripods and their supertelephoto lenses.  It was only thanks to a couple of forbearing photographers that I was able to squeeze in to a spot between them with my own tripod and (rented) supertelephoto.

Alone In The Falls

My first morning at the falls presented me with just one bear and no salmon jumping.  So, I screwed my 4-stop ND filter onto the lens and got in a little “silky water” practice….handheld!  You see, the tripod bore the 500mm lens, so rather than take time to change out camera/lens combos, I just steadied my camera and 100-400mm lens on the railing of the platform and successfully achieved some silky-water shots.

Silky water shots aside, I definitely acquired my most dramatic bear images here at this platform.

Caught One

Portrait Of A Bear

Caught One

Caught One

My current plans – barring any unforeseen circumstances – are to return to the park in 2014.   I urge those of you who can, to travel to the wild, remotely beautiful state of Alaska and visit this park to see the bears for yourself.  It’s an amazing opportunity to view these creatures closeup and in their own environment (well, as close up as the National Park Service allows – if you are a photographer, a telephoto lens sure helps).

Oh, and if you are interested in knowing the details of where I stayed while in the park, go to this link.  If you want to know about my gear and also the best times for photography at Katmai, click on this link to go to the article I wrote for the National Parks Traveler website.  And, while you are at it, go to the Traveler’s Facebook page and Like them.

Becky At Brooks Falls

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Filed under Alaska, bears, Katmai National Park, National Parks, Photography, Travel, wildlife

Behind The Scenes At Katmai–The Riffles Platform

Out In The Riffles

A bear and a bird in the riffles downriver

My last “Behind The Scenes At Katmai” post highlighted photographs taken of and from the Lower Platform, just across the floating bridge from Brooks Lodge, in Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska.

This post shows you photographs taken from the Riffles Platform.  This place is sort of like the middle child of viewing platforms in the park.  Everybody either sees lots of action at the Lower Platform or the more iconic Brooks Falls Platform, so they may tend not to spend as much time at this platform, located just a few hundred yards downriver from Brooks Falls.

Looking Toward Brooks Falls

A Bear And A Bird At Brooks Falls

Looking upriver toward Brooks Falls

The Riffles Platform received its moniker from the numerous small, shallow rapids (riffles) in front of and to the sides of this viewing area.  Our photo tour leader informed us that this is the area where we would see sows with their cubs because, unless desperate for food, the sows would stay clear of the falls where most of the males staked out spots.  While I was there, I did not see any momma/cub combos – I saw those at the Lower Platform.  What I did see were younger, more inexperienced bears and older bears looking for easier fishing.

Bear On A Rock

Bear Water Seagull

What Are You Lookin At Buddy

Standing In The Riffles

To me, the Riffles Platform was analogous to an overflow parking lot at an event venue – when the Brooks Falls Platform got too crowded, people would come on down to this platform.

I didn’t see as much action at this platform as I did the others, but what action I did see yielded some very nice images.

Next post:  The Brooks Falls Platform

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