Photography in The National Parks: Yosemite Tried, True, and New

Yosemite Valley Landscape, Yosemite National Park (California)

The National Parks Traveler has published my latest photography column. This month’s column is all about capturing iconic as well as new perspectives of this particular national park. To read the article, click on the image above.

As for this image: I drove into Yosemite Valley several times during my week’s stay in the park. Every time, I’d pass by this one spot along the road – a small pullout large enough for a vehicle, right next to the rocky banks of the Merced River, which was a trickle of its former self. So finally, I stopped, took out my camera and tripod, and gingerly picked my way to a spot to photograph forest, river, and El Capitan (I believe that’s El Cap) all beneath a blue sky with wispy clouds.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Nevada Basin And Range Landscape

A Long Ribbon Of Road From Ely To Great Basin National Park
A Hazy Summer Morning Over Wind Turbines And Nevada Valley And Mountain Landscape

I’d left Ely (pronounced Eee-lee), Nevada, around 6:30 a.m. for an hour’s drive to Great Basin National Park. I was about 30-ish miles south of Ely when I rounded a corner and started heading down into this wide, flat valley. The wind turbines, ribbon of road that looks like it goes way up into the mountains on the other side of the valley, and the sunlight highlighting the veil of haze captured my photographer’s eye and I just had to pull over and get a few photos.

In reality, that long road going up into the mountains is actually a dirt road on someone’s private property (lucky them). This paved road takes an almost sharp turn to the left and parallels the mountains before rounding the corner to the right.

And those wind turbines made a great geographic marker for me on the way from the park back toward Ely on the day I headed back home to Washington state. I’d left the Baker area at 2 a.m. so it was dark heading toward Ely. Distances are difficult to discern in the dark because you can’t see the landscape. However, when I saw the synchronous blinking red lights, I knew I was driving toward and past that small wind turbine farm and that Ely was closer than I thought.

Nevada has some amazing landscape and geology, and the roads are very good, but the stretches of road through the state are long and out in the middle of nowhere, seemingly far away from civilization (and gas stations).

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Traveler’s Checklist To Yosemite National Park

A Boardwalk Leading Line Across Cook’s Meadow, Yosemite National Park (California)

Whew! I’m finally back from a 2-week trip to Yosemite and Great Basin national parks! It was a great trip, although I am now totally sick of so much driving. I captured great photos and have plenty of material for articles for the National Parks Traveler. As a matter of fact, the first article is the Traveler’s Checklist for Yosemite National Park, published in today’s edition of the Traveler. Whether it’s your first or your fourth trip, there might be something in the checklist that piques your interest.

To read the article, click on the photo above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Tiny Climbers Scaling The Granite At El Capitan

I spy with my little eye left of center the two teeny tiny climbers – Captured at 100mm focal length
Can you see the climbers now? See the guy in the orange shirt – left of center – 93% crop of the original image above

I think rock climbers (and mountain climbers, too) are CRAZY! Of course, this is coming from someone who has more than a healthy respect (read fear) of great heights and gets a little vertigo just looking at photos of such things as people hiking Angels Landing in Zion National Park.

That said, one of the things I wanted to do while visiting Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park was try to first spot, then photograph, climbers hanging from the sheer granite wall of the famous El Capitan. I’d already googled where good places to stand and watch for climbers would be, and one of the best places is actually right across the road from El Cap. I remember first driving by that spot and wondering what the heck people were doing pointing their smartphones way up in the air. And then, I realized, they were trying to get photos of the climbers on the wall (duh, Becky).

So yesterday afternoon, while driving through the valley, I parked along the road (at a nice, wide, long parking area all along that road) brought out my 100-400mm lens, and started scanning the sheer walls. With a little pointing from others nearby, I finally found these two guys (thank you, climber, for wearing that bright orange shirt). Took me awhile to suss them out, though, because I am not kidding when I tell you the climbers are so tiny against the sheer grandeur of El Cap’s cliff wall. These photos hopefully give you an idea. The first photo is the original captured at a focal length of 100mm. Can you spot them hanging from the cliff wall? They are just a tad left of center.The second photo is a 93% crop of the first, so you can see them a little better (the orange shirt helps). Even with that crop, they still look tiny against the granite elements. I have other photos taken at a focal length of 400mm, but think this original and crop make a better point of humans conquering the elements – in this case, conqering the granite height of a famous landmark in the park.

Oh, FYI – I was curious as to how climbers get back down, once they’ve made it to the top. They can rappel back down, but also, there are trails that take them back down to the famous Camp 4, which is considered the “climbers’ camp.”

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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A Solo Photographer Traveling During The Pandemic – The Precautions I Take

I’m getting ready for a Big Road Trip to Yosemite National Park, Devils Postpile National Monument, and Great Basin National Park. During the pandemic. I’m not one of those vaccine- or Covid-deniers. I believe in wearing masks, keeping a social distance, and washing my hands (a lot!). I’ve taken the Covid vaccine and the other day got my annual flu shot. So here I am, preparing for this trip. How am I doing it in a pandemic? Actually, very similar – pretty much exactly the same – as when I traveled to Crater Lake National Park, Redwood National and State Parks, and Whiskeytown National Recreation Area back in 2020. For those of you interested in learning what preparations / precautions I took, read on. For those of you who roll your eyes and think the thing is a hoax or not serious at all (despite all the REAL facts, not Faux Fox News facts), then you might as well just move right along and look for something else to read.

Ok, with that out of the way, here I go.

  • I’m a solo traveler. I much prefer it that way – especially during the pandemic. I can go where I want, when I want, do what I want, and if I feel like stopping and spending 30 minutes or longer photographing an area of interest, I don’t have to worry about the other person in the car being bored out of their mind and wanting to get to their hotel room. I also don’t have to worry about entertaining anybody else. When I am on a photo trip, I am all about the photography.
  • I’m driving, not flying anywhere. Even if there was no pandemic, I still wouldn’t fly much at this point in time. I’m sick of it. I don’t really like to fly, but it’s a means to an end and I spent 20 years flying to national parks when I lived and worked in TX. So, when I finally was able to get the hell out and move to Washington state, one of the first things I did, a year later, was trade in my little Honda Fit (which was perfect for commuting to and from Houston) and purchase my first-ever SUV. And, I LOVE it! I can pack what I want in it without worrying about weight limits and, if needed, I can sleep in it. Besides all that, why the heck would I want to fly amongst people who bitch about wearing masks on the plane and then get totally unruly and cause themselves and everybody else problems? Plus, I enjoy driving. The journey to a national park is part of my enjoyment … although I am not looking forward to the 15-hour drive I’ll have during that first day of the trip.
  • I wear a medical id bracelet so in case of an emergency, first responders know who to call and can access my medical information. It’s a good idea to have one of these, whether you travel alone or in a group, actually. I use Road ID, but I know there are other similar operations out there.
  • I pack two large suitcases. One has all the clothing/underwear/toiletries/first aid supplies I’ll need (and then some, actually) for my time away, and the other one has nothing but food, condiments, and utensils (bowl, small plate, knife, fork, spoon). And my coffee maker. And my hot pot to boil water for reconstituting freeze-dried meals.
  • I spray my pants and shirts with permethrin to protect against ticks and other pests. I use DEET or other repellant to protect my bare skin from insect pests.
  • I wear bright / neon long-sleeve shirts. That way, my arms are protected against the sun and if something happens to me, I’ll hopefully be easy to spot off the trail.
  • I carry bear spray. When I flew, I had to wait until I landed and then find someplace that rented out bear spray. Now that I drive my own vehicle, I can get the bear spray and have it with me all the time.
  • Yes, I take all of my food with me. While this does not preclude going to a drive-through (sometimes, I crave McDonalds if it is nearby), I have absolutely no intention of eating inside any building other than my own room. What do I take with me? Well, it’s a personal preference, of course, but here ya go:
    • Ground coffee. I love my coffee (Peet’s Italian Roast), but usually wait until I return from a day in the field to drink it. I don’t want to have to pee all the time, and I need/want it while working through the day’s images when I return in the evening.
    • Ramen instant cup-of-soup (Maruchan is my favorite brand)
    • Annie Chun instant noodle soups
    • Freeze-dried meals of various brands: Mountain House, Backpacker’s Pantry, Peak Refuel, Alpineaire, Heather’s Choice. Mountain House is my fave because it’s always well-seasoned. The other brands tend to be a bit on the bland side so hot sauce or a little extra salt comes in handy – and I bring hot sauce, salt, and pepper with me. REI.com carries a great assortment of each brand, plus, if you are a member, you’ll get a dividend at year’s end (or thereabouts) that’s 10 percent of whatever you spent over the year.
    • Canned tuna in olive oil (the most flavorful, imo)
    • Vienna sausage
    • Fruit leather
    • Gel packs for hiking (I like Clif Shot and Hammer brands). They taste good, give me a boost of energy, are easy to carry in my photographer vest pockets, and I don’t spend time trying to chew and swallow bars with the texture of sawdust
    • Toblerone and Hershey’s chocolate bars
    • Peanut butter
    • Saltine crackers
    • Loaf of bread
    • Snack chips (of course!)
    • Little packets of mayonnaise, ketchup, and mustard
    • Clif Energy Bars (I love their nut butter-filled bars and their sweet & salty bars)
    • The little cans of coke
    • Little cartons of cream that I keep in a small, thermal, lunchbox. I love cream with my coffee. I’ll take half & half if there is nothing else available, but I hate those little packets of non-dairy creamer and I’ll only drink black coffee if I have no other recourse. Yes, I’m spoiled.
  • I bring my own water. I get those jugs of water at the grocery store. I used to think it was an old wives’ tale, but from personal experience, I can tell you that drinking water from the tap in different areas/states/counties/towns brings on – for me anyway – diarrhea, because each place has its own set of microbes in the water. Nothing to kill me, but def enough to create havoc with my digestive system for several days. Besides, I like keeping lots of water in the SUV, in general, so I can quickly refill my water bottles after a day out in the field.
  • I also bring Gatorade to help with replacing the salts lost during a hike. After reading Andrea Lankford’s “Ranger Confidential,” I discovered hyponatremia can be every bit as bad as dehydration.
  • In addition to the first aid supplies I pack in the suitcase, I have a small storage bin of first aid supplies, in addition to extra toilet paper, paper towels, Kleenex, rubbing alcohol and peroxide that I always keep in the vehicle.
  • I have rheumatoid arthritis and high blood pressure, so I always pack my meds with me.
  • I wear glasses, so always carry a spare pair in addition to prescription sunglasses and those sunglasses that fit over prescription glasses. After the emergency eye surgery I had (which caused me to cancel / reschedule some of my June Big Road Trip), I am cognizant of protecting my eyes to the point of hypervigilance.
  • I carry some sort of fire starter with me, just in case. It’s one of those 10 essentials.
  • Sleeping bag – I prefer to sleep in the bag on top of a hotel/cabin bed, so I take it with me. Also, if I am ever stuck in the middle of a snowstorm or something, I have something to sleep in / keep me warm.
  • Blanket for the car. Again, along similar lines if I am stuck somewhere and it gets cold, but I also use the blanket to cover up the stuff I have in the rear seat.
  • A couple of towels and a hand cloth or two – these are mainly to keep in the vehicle.
  • Hiking poles
  • Extra hiking boots
  • A couple of small hunting knives – both for protection and in case I need to saw/chop/cut something.
  • A couple of tripods (I like carrying a spare heavier tripod for those times when it’s extremely windy). I also often use a lighter tripod as a hiking staff in addition to keeping my camera stable. A 2-fer-1 usefulness.
  • Hats for both sun and cold weather
  • Large flashlight, small flashlight, LED lantern, headlamp. I have two headlamps – one that shines regular light, and one that only shines red light suitable for night photography.
  • Clorox disinfectant wipes, Wet Wipes, hand sanitizer – I used the Clorox wipes for wiping down everything I might conceivably touch once I am at a hotel or in a cabin. It’s the first thing I do after checking in and getting my room key.
  • Lots and lots of face masks. My sister is a seamstress extraordinaire who spent an entire year (actually, she is still doing it) sewing for the family these awesome facemasks with three layers of fabric in fun patterns – most of mine are all national park- or camping/travel-themed.
  • Surgical gloves
  • Extra trash bags

Now, for the camera stuff. Again, I’ve got that kitchen sink mentality. If I’ve got them, I’ll take them. That, plus I have, indeed, broken a couple of lenses and a couple of cameras during trips to Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park (super strong wind blew over the not-so-sturdy tripod and camera setup) and Yellowstone National Park (camera and telephoto lens too close to the passenger side door and fell out when I opened the door). I always try to be so careful with all my camera gear, but accidents happen. Trust me when I tell you that while it certainly exercises one’s creativity when framing a photo with a lens you don’t really want to use for a particular subject but have no other alternative, it is also a First World crappy feeling, not to mention expensive when repairing or replacing.

  • Tons of memory cards. During the very first photography workshop I ever attended (Arizona Highways Photoscapes) back in 2008. I brought along plenty of memory cards, but ended up giving a few of them away to people who had only brought a single memory card with them. You need to bring plenty of memory cards with you so you don’t waste valuable photo time trying to decide which photos to keep and which to delete to make room for future shots.
  • Extra spare batteries. Very important. Granted, most cameras nowadays have a pretty good battery life, but some cameras – I’m looking at you, Fujifilm – have a battery life that sucks for air. I love the GFX series, but, at least with the GFX100 and GFX100s – even when you turn the camera off, the settings still show up on the top LCD screen, and that, in turn, leaches away the battery juice over time. I don’t know why Fujifilm did that. I could care less what my camera settings are when I turn the camera off. Anyway, I bring plenty of spare batteries with me, as well as a phone charger for the car and a separate one for my hotel room/cabin.
  • Battery chargers – spare batteries will only work so long before they need more charging.
  • Filters – graduated neutral density (grad ND), neutral density (ND), circular polarizer (CPL) and regular  UV protection. All of them are “thin mount,” meaning you can’t stack filters on top of each other. I use this type of filter because I don’t like the vignetting I get when using a wide-angle lens with a regular filter. I’m also pretty redundant and pack plenty, because I’ve been known to crack one of two filters at times. Saves my lenses … well, most of the time – except for that Hawaii trip …
  • Wireless shutter releases – Ok, I use them for selfie profile pics of me and my camera against a beautiful landscape.
  • Lenses – I’m redundant with the lenses, too, but that’s because I have room to pack them and the memories of broken lenses still haunts me. The main lenses I always take with me, spare room or not, are:
    • Wide-angle 16-35mm
    • Standard 24-105mm
    • Telephoto 100 – 400mm
    • For the Fujifilm cameras: 23mm (equivalent to 18mm), 30mm (equivalent to 25mm), 45-100mm zoom (equivalent to 36-79mm)

If I have more room, then I’ll also consider packing the following:

  • 11-24mm (Canon) or 12-24mm (Sony)
    • 200-600mm (Sony
    • 14mm
    • 24-70mm
  • If I flew, I’d try to take 2 – 3 camera bodies with me. Driving, I can take more. Why so many? The memory of damaging a couple of camera bodies ….
  • Lens cleaning tissues and microfiber cloths
  • Travel laptop – 15”
  • Several portable hard drives – redundancy is a photographer’s best friend, so I like to download the photos from the memory card onto two separate hard drives in addition to the laptop. I then pack away the used memory cards rather than reformat them at the time, because I’m a pessimist and am always worried that something will happen to laptop or hard drives during the trip. I keep the photos on the memory cards until I’ve returned home, and then I reformat them.
  • I have considered taking a memory card backup storage device like Nexto or Gnarbox but haven’t read enough reviews about them. However, if there was ever a time I would not be able to take the laptop, then I’d plunk the credit card down and get one of those devices.

Ok, let’s talk about lodging. I wrote earlier that I much prefer a room to a tent. I’m 60 and have had rheumatoid arthritis since my mid-twenties, so while I could still car camp, I won’t ever be doing much in the way of backcountry backpacking, and I just much prefer a room, if I can afford it. During the pandemic, I look to stay in cabins, which are usually set apart from one another and I don’t have to worry about walking a crowded hallway, taking a crowded elevator, pushing elevator buttons used by others, or taking a crowded stairwell. That’s not always an option, but for this trip, I managed to get a cabin for the Yosemite portion, and a sort of motel-type room at a small resort near Great Basin national park. If I had done the smart thing and invested in a little travel trailer, that would be my ideal mode of travel. For now, though, I’ll go with my SUV and renting a room/cabin.

Traveling solo has its rewards and its setbacks. I’ve always traveled solo and revel in being on my own, with time to myself. It’s liberating to be apart for a bit from other people/family. When I return home, I appreciate even more seeing family and sleeping in my own comfy bed. Solo travel is not necessarily for everybody, though. I know one woman who would never ever want to travel by herself. She absolutely needs to have someone else with her. And, if I have car problems, it’s just me, myself, and I having to fix the issue.

Regarding safety, because I travel solo, I do what I can to make sure my family knows where I am and can be contacted in case of an emergency. I leave names, addresses and phone numbers of where I’m staying with my family, and make sure to text, call, or email them whenever possible, just to let them know I am ok. I take my iPhone and wear my Apple Watch because both have GPS in them, which I have turned on.  I also have an App called Find My Friends that my sister also has, so we can keep track of one another. When out in the field, I try to be as observant of my surroundings as I possibly can and tend to stick to the more-utilized trails.

I think that about covers what I do when traveling and the precautions I take regarding the pandemic. If you’ve made it to the end of the post without rolling your eyes at some point, I congratulate you. Just remember, this is how I roll. Not everybody takes the kitchen sink with them. Not everybody likes to travel by themselves. Not everybody wants to pay or has the money to pay for a hotel or lodge room. Not everybody likes to drive – especially long drives. Different people have different modes of travel, and they take different things with them that they want/need. Perhaps my post, here, will give you an idea for your own travels, or maybe not. However you travel, please stay safe, and please keep in mind the safety of others. If you travel to a national park, remember to bring your masks, because wearing one is required to go inside any park building. It’s a small thing to do, doesn’t hamper your supposed freedoms, and really does protect other people – even the ones you don’t like.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Fun Fact Friday August 20, 2021

Cooling down on a hot day in Petrified Forest National Park (Arizona)
Just a pair of ravens chilling out on a snowy winter day in Canyonlands National Park (Utah)

It’s #FunFactFriday ! I have always liked ravens. I like crows too, but ravens more. So, here’s a few interesting facts about ravens. These birds are super smart and very curious. They are also quite acrobatic when flying, turning somersaults mid-air. They’ve got a vocabulary of about 30 calls (including flight calls, hunger calls, and danger calls) in addition to non-vocal communication (like snapping their beaks). Once mated, it’s for life, and they usually nest in the same location year after year.

You can tell the difference between ravens and crows in that (among other things), ravens are larger, have uneven tail feathers (which you can see when they fan them out) and have curvier beaks. Ravens usually travel in pairs while crows travel in larger groups (called “murders” as in a murder of crows).

When I stayed for a couple of days at the North Cascades Institute back in 2019, they talked about a pair of ravens they’d named Bonnie and Clyde. These ravens could unzip backpacks in their efforts to get at hikers’ food. I believe I actually met this pair one day while photographing at the Diablo Lake Overlook. They had landed on the fence railing and were eyeing my camera pack, then hopped down next to the pack. I had a feeling they were trying to figure out where the zippers were, so I had to shoo them away.

The one raven with its mouth open in the top photo is doing something you’ll see other birds doing: it’s called gular (goo-lur) fluttering and they do it to cool down on a hot day since they cannot sweat like humans do.

Oh, and while I am on the subject of fun facts, my latest quiz and trivia piece has been published in the National Parks Traveler. It’s all about “August notables.” To read the article, click on either of the images above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under birds, Fun Fact Friday, National Parks, National Parks Quiz, National Parks Traveler, nature, Photography

National Park Service Requiring Face Masks For Everyone Entering Buildings

A Family On The Steep, Winding Trail In Paradise, Mount Rainier National Park (Washington state)

“National Park Service officials on Monday directed that all visitors, employees, and contractors entering NPS buildings and in crowded areas of parks must wear a face mask, regardless of their vaccination status.”

And I say GOOD! I have absolutely no problem whatsoever wearing a piece of cloth over my mouth and nose inside a building. It protects me, it protects others. It doesn’t infringe on my freedom and I don’t feel one bit whiny about it. The Delta variant aint goin’ away. So, when you visit a national park and want to go into one of the park buildings, then take and wear a mask …. or don’t go in at all.

To read the rest of this article that was just published by the National Parks Traveler, click on the image above.

P.S., I’ll be taking scads of national park-themed masks with me on my upcoming trip to Yosemite National Park, Devils Postpile National Monument, and Great Basin National Park.

#recreateresponsibly #wearamask #findyourpark

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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It’s Trivia Tuesday, August 10, 2021

A keyhole kiva at Coyote Village, within the Far View Complex of ruins at Mesa Verde National Park (Colorado)

It’s Trivia Tuesday ! Did you know that the Ancestral Pueblo people were living in ruins in what is now Mesa Verde National Park for some 300 years prior to building the famous cliff dwellings? The Far View Complex was the most densely populated area within what is now the park, from A.D. 900 to A.D. 1300. The Far View Complex included almost 50 villages, including Coyote Village, where this photo of a keyhole kiva was taken. Kivas, fyi, were specialized rooms (round, rectangular, or keyhole) where special rites and other meetings were held.

And now you know!

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Colorado, Mesa Verde National Park, National Parks, Photography, Travel, Trivia Tuesday

National Parks Quiz And Trivia #35: The Waterfall Edition

The Weeping Wall along Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park (Montana)

Ok, I’ll admit the image above is nothing to write home about, but I posted this because one of the quiz questions is about the Weeping Wall in my latest quiz and trivia piece published in today’s edition of the National Parks Traveler. It’s all about waterfalls in the national parks. Click on the link to test your knowledge about these sometimes-ephemeral, always beautiful cascades of water you might spy just off the side of the road or along the trail in a national park.

To take the quiz and read the trivia, just click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Some Very Quick Thoughts On The Fujifilm GFX 100S

A Trail And The Mountain, Sunrise Area, Mount Rainier National Park (Washington state)

I don’t know how many of you out there are still on a waiting list for a Fujifilm GFX 100S. I had to wait 5 months for mine and I only lucked out because I started looking at camera store websites other than the Big Two (BH Photo and Adorama). I can honestly say that, if you are a landscape photographer, the wait is worth it. The resolution is phenomenal and Fujifilm has not only actually brought a medium format camera down to the price of a high-end SLR like Sony, Canon, or Nikon, but at about the same size, too!

So, not too long ago, I spent a couple of days with my cameras up at Mount Rainier National Park. My main reason – aside from getting out and about – was to give my Fujifilm GFX 100S more of a workout. It wasn’t a complete workout because I didn’t try to get any night shots (the moon was out, making the sky too bright for decent star pics – that plus I was too tired from a full day of hiking), but it was enough for me to give a few more thoughts on this camera as well as the Fujifilm GFX 100.

Sunrise at the Sunrise Area, Mount Rainier National Park (Washington state)

1. The level of detail is simply amazing. I find, though, that I must add more saturation to the image when working with it on the computer. Sure, I could switch the film simulation from Provia/Standard to Velvia/Vivid, but that’s just a bit too vivid for me. That, plus it appears – on the LCD anyway – that some of the finer detail seen in the Provia/Standard setting is removed, or covered over, with that large boost of saturated color in the Velvia setting. I tend to apply saturation judiciously and thus prefer using Photoshop, where I feel I have a little more control.

2. Learning the menu setup is like learning another language. I’m language-challenged, but I do know my rudimentary way around the Fujifilm, Sony Alpha, and Canon menu setups. The menu setup for this brand of camera is extensive, but easier to intuit than Sony’s menu settings. That said, it behooves one to do a marginal skim of the owner’s manual before heading out into the field. I didn’t do that and ended up spending 30+ minutes trying to work with a setting while out in the park, wasting some good lighting conditions. And, I know better than to do that! Jeesh.

3. Battery life sucks for air – especially with the GFX 100S. My intention was to use the GFX 100S for an entire day of shooting, but both the battery that came with the camera as well as the spare battery I’d purchased pooped out on me before midday. I’ve since ordered an extra couple of batteries on top of the two I have, and I went ahead and ordered a couple more batteries for the GFX 100, although it’s battery life seems to be a bit longer. I just don’t want to be caught out in the field empty handed when that once-in-a-lifetime composition comes along. Know what I mean?

4. Two-second timer. When the camera is on the tripod, I always use the 2-second timer. It eliminates that last bit of vibration from my finger touching the shutter button. With both the GFX100 and the GFX100S, there’s three parts to the timer. In the Shooting setting (the little camera icon in the menu), you can set the self-timer to 10 seconds, 2 seconds, or Off. Then, you need to tell the camera to remember that self- timer setting in order for that timer to remain in effect for the next image, or if you turn the camera off and then back on at a later time. Otherwise, the timer will only work for one shot. Then, you’ll have to go back in and tell the camera to use the timer again. You’ll also need to decide whether or not you want the self-timer lamp on. That’s the little light that turns on while the s elf-timer is in use. For night shots (which I haven’t tried yet), I’ll turn that lamp off.

That’s all I’ve got, for now. I’ll be taking the two cameras with me on a forthcoming 2-week trip to a couple of national parks I’ve never visited (fingers crossed I don’t have any further health issues – or car issues, for that matter). I’m not certain if I’ll be able to get any star shots due to the smoky skies from area wildfires, but if the sky is clear, then I’ll see how well these cameras do regarding night scenes.

Mid-morning At Reflection Lakes, Mount Rainier National Park (Washington state)

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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