Photography In The National Parks: Exploration Along The Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail

Dry Falls Vista

The National Parks Traveler has published my latest photo column. This month, it’s all about my day trip to Eastern Washington’s Dry Falls and Channeled Scablands landscape along the Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail.

To read the article, click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Eastern Washington, Geology, Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel, Washington State

The Essential RVing Guide To The National Parks

“Exploring the National Park System by RV is one of the quintessential approaches to visiting national parks, monuments, national recreation areas, and other park system units that combined represent what Wallace Stegner defined as the best idea America ever had.”

The National Parks Traveler has just published an eBook titled “The Essential Guide to RVing In The National Park System.” this eBook “presents RV enthusiasts with a rich collection of articles exploring the park system by RV, camper, or trailer that is supported by a directory packed with RVing specific details on more than 250 campgrounds in more than 70 parks.”

“Through a table of contents that divides the country geographically, you can quickly find the park you want to visit, click on its link, and find both an overview of that park along with a chart of campground information ranging from hookup availability, generator hours, ADA site availability, nightly fees, maximum RV length individual sites can handle, and much more.”

I just purchased and downloaded this eBook and was able to export it to both my Kindle app as well as my iPad’s PDF Editor, so I can carry it along with my iPad where ever I go … of course, now I need an RV, camper, or trailer, but that will come later (I hope).

In the meantime, I urge you to check this eBook out for yourself by clicking on the image above to be taken to the Traveler article where you can make your purchase. For $9.95, it’s a great deal and it also helps the Traveler continue its mission of providing you news and other articles about the national parks and other protected lands.

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Filed under National Parks, National Parks Traveler

Help Out The National Parks Traveler And Check Out The Traveler’s New Apparel Store

The National Parks Traveler has a new apparel store! Designed around the national park photography of Yours Truly, the shirts and hoodies let you align as a traveler in your favorite park. While this initial launch offers images from Yellowstone, Glacier, and Olympic national parks, future editions will let you claim Bryce Canyon National Park, Zion National Park, Katmai National Park, Grand Teton National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, Yosemite National Park, and other destinations around the National Park System.

You also can forgo a park image and simply declare yourself a parks traveler with the National Parks Traveler logo on the left breast and “National Parks Traveler” running down the left sleeve in the news organization’s colors.

Click on any of the images above to go to the Traveler store, then save the link as a Favorite. The images above are examples of what you can find on the store (different sizes, shirt colors, designs).

Keep an eye on the store for new editions. By purchasing these items, you not only can align with your favorite park, but support the Traveler, as a small percentage of each sale goes right towards operational expenses.

P.S., I’ve already done a little shopping myself, and once I receive the products, I’ll show you how they look. Ever the little shopper, I’m pretty excited the Traveler finally has a store out there.

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Filed under National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography

National Parks Quiz And Trivia #49

Click on the image to go to the Traveler’s Quiz and Trivia #49

The National Parks Traveler has published my latest quiz and trivia piece. There’s plenty to learn about the 423 units within the National Park System. Just how much do you know? Click on the image and test your knowledge.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under National Parks, National Parks Quiz, National Parks Traveler

National Parks Traveler June Webinar: Slough Slogs and Park Funding in Everglades National Park

Traveler editor Kurt Repanshek and Yvette Cano on an Everglades “slough slog” / Traveler correspondent Kim O’Connell photo

If you listened to the National Parks Traveler’s podcast episode 166, you’ll know what a “slough (slew) slog” is. It was a fun podcast to listen to and I learned some new things from it. It’s worth a listen. Anyway, this June 6th will be the Traveler’s monthly webinar, and it’s about slough slogging and park funding in Everglades National Park. The Traveler’s editor Kurt Repanshek will host Yvette Cano, the park’s education director.

If you are interested in registering for this June webinar, click on the image above.

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Take The National Parks Traveler’s Reader Survey

Help The Traveler Provide More Of What You Want For Your National Parks News – Click This Image And Take The Reader Survey

The National Parks Traveler wants to know what it is you like / want to know about the national parks and what you’d like to see / see more of in the National Parks Traveler. If you are interested in helping out the Traveler, then click on the image above.

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Photography In The National Parks: More Favorite Spots For Photography

Sunrise Viewed From The Sinnott Memorial Overlook At Crater Lake National Park (Oregon)

If you have ever visited a national park more than once, then you probably have a few favorite spots in that park that you like to revisit, right? I certainly have favorite spots, and managed to find more than a few in the park units I visited since late 2019. I have written about these spots in my latest photography article for the National Parks Traveler.

To read my article, click on the image above.

Copyright Rebecca Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Photography In The National Parks

Science In Yellowstone National Park

Colloidal Pool in Porcelain Basin was one of the hydrothermal features studied in the YVO 2021 annual report, Yellowstone National Park / photo by Rebecca Latson

Photography articles are not the only things about which I write for the National Parks Traveler. I also pen quizzes, park checklists, and itineraries, to name a few other pieces I contribute. Last week, you might have read a piece I wrote synopsizing a technical article about how scientists are running simulation scenarios for lahars (volcanic mudflows) that might occur due to an avalanche on Mount Rainier.

Today, the National Parks Traveler has published another article I’ve written: a synopsis of the 2021 annual report produced by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) of scientific research conducted over 2021 in Yellowstone National Park and some conclusions reached. It was a cool annual report to read and fun to condense into an article for the Traveler.

If you are interested in finding out what went on in Yellowstone National Park in 2021, and want to download the full 2021 YVO annual report, click on the image above.

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Filed under Geology, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Yellowstone National Park

National Parks Traveler’s May Webinar Is Now Recorded For Your Viewing Leisure

Click On This Image To Go To The Webinar Link

If you did not have the opportunity to register and tune in to the National Parks Traveler’s May webinar interviewing brothers Jonathan and Destry Jarvis, two elder statesmen who have been involved with national parks conservation / environmentalism / politics for a combined 90 years, then you have the chance now to watch the recorded webinar at your leisure.

Click on the image to go to the webinar link.

Image of a sunrise and sunbeams over Arches National Park, copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Don’t Throw Those Dud Photos Away Just Yet!

Looking Out Into The Evening – Original (Glacier National Park, Montana)

I was wandering through my Glacier National Park photo archives, looking for a particular shot, when I spied an original, unedited image I’d not touched. I remember exactly where I was when this shot was captured. I stood at the Wild Goose Island view area at St. Mary Lake, and turned to the side to photograph the scene there as the sunset afterglow turned the sky and clouds into a bright, fiery display.

You can tell that from this photo above, right?

It was the very first photo workshop I’d ever attended, back in 2008. I’d just purchased my first full frame camera: a Canon 5D with 12 huge, magnificent megapixels. I was still learning how to use it because I’d never heard the advice about knowing how to use your camera before you set off on a photo adventure. I pretty much knew zilch, to be honest (although I learned so much from that one workshop). Oh, I was not a newbie to photography; I’d photographed with SLR cameras since high school, but always using that Auto mode. I never really used the Manual mode in depth until I purchased that full framer. And, as you can see, I failed miserably at capturing that evening vista. The ISO was 100, shutter speed was 1/100 of a second, and the aperture was f/4 (although I think that was the widest aperture I could get with that particular lens, having never heard of a “fast lens” before). I can’t remember if the camera was on a tripod or not, although I might have been handholding it – the ostensible reason for using such a fast shutter speed.

You’ve read this from me before: the camera always has the data, it just needs to be brought forth with proper editing. Luckily, I had the presence of mind to not throw this original image away, which is surprising. Probably I just saw it, didn’t know how to work it, and just moved on to the next shot on the memory card. Hell, I was still trying to wrap myself around this new program called Adobe Elements – I had not even graduated to Adobe Photoshop yet.

Now, segue to 2022. I returned to the archives and picked up this original to start working on it for yucks and giggles.

Looking Out Into The Evening – Revised Image (Glacier National Park, Montana)

Quite the difference, huh?

Oh, I wouldn’t try to make a print out of this shot, because it’s still pretty grainy even after using noise reduction to the scene. But it definitely looks like the view I witnessed, with the fiery sky and the inner glow to the landscape as the evening settled in.

This, folks, is a great example of why you should NEVER immediately throw out a shot you think is a dud the first time you look at it. Unless it’s totally blurred or unfocused, there is always the chance that image can be rescued. It might take a few weeks or a few years or even a decade of learning new editing skills before you touch that “dud” image, but as you can see here, the beauty of that evening has been teased out for all to view.

Twelve megapixels back then was quite a feat. Now, I work with cameras possessing between 50 – 102 megapixels. Like editing skills, camera technology has come a long way in 14 years.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Glacier National Park MT, National Parks, Photography